Corpus ID: 17481972

METHODS FOR THE CONTROL OF WANDERING JEW (TRADESCANTIA FLUMINENSIS) AT “RANGITAWA’, RANGITIKEI DISTRICT, AND NOTES ON OTHER ASPECTS OF CONSERVING THIS FOREST REMNANT

@inproceedings{Lovelock1989METHODSFT,
  title={METHODS FOR THE CONTROL OF WANDERING JEW (TRADESCANTIA FLUMINENSIS) AT “RANGITAWA’, RANGITIKEI DISTRICT, AND NOTES ON OTHER ASPECTS OF CONSERVING THIS FOREST REMNANT},
  author={Brent Lovelock},
  year={1989}
}
Methods for the control of wandering Jew (Tradescantia fluminensis) are reviewed and one selected to eradicate this weed from a forest remnant near the lower Rangitikei River. The botanical importance of the forest is assessed in the context of Manawatu Plains Ecological District. Its future conservation management is related to other problem weeds, notably Cobaea scandens, Solanum jasminoides, Passiflora mollissima, Wisteria sinensis, Aegopodium podograria, Lonicera japonica, and Hedera helix… Expand
Incidence of P . traversi in Tradescantia-affected forest remnants 2
This study was initiated owing to concern that removal of the invasive ground cover, Tradescantia fluminensis, might adversely effect the rare, giant predatory land snail, Powelliphanta traversi. OfExpand
Experimenting with methods to control Tradescantia fluminensis, an invasive weed of native forest remnants in New Zealand
TLDR
Re-growth of tradescantia and invasion of other weeds were positively related to light availability, which increased in the more canopy-depleted areas, and negatively related to native forest regeneration measured two years after initial treatment. Expand
The impact of an invasive weed Tradescantia fluminensis on native forest regeneration
TLDR
It is shown that Tradescantia biomass increased logistically with available light, to a maximum at 10–15% full light, and predicted that increases in native species richness and abundance will accumulate with increasing suppression of the weed. Expand
Efficacy of Postemergence Herbicides for Control of Small-Leaf Spiderwort (Tradescantia fluminensis) in Florida
ABSTRACT Tradescantia fluminensis (small-leaf spiderwort; SLSW) is a fast-growing herbaceous groundcover and one of the most problematic invasive plants in Florida. The objective of this research wasExpand
on the ecology of Tradescantia fluminensis and a biological control programme for its management
Distribution and dispersal of T. fluminensis Tradescantia fluminensis is indigenous to the tropical rainforests of SE Brazil and NE Argentina. It has been grown worldwide as an ornamental, and hasExpand
Invasion by a Perennial Herb Increases Decomposition Rate and Alters Nutrient Availability in Warm Temperate Lowland Forest Remnants
TLDR
The results show that Tradescantia increases litter decomposition and alters nutrient availability, effects that could influence the long-term viability of the majority of podocarp–broadleaf forest remnants affected with TradesCantia in New Zealand. Expand
Sun/shade acclimation and nitrogen nutrition of Tradescantia fluminensis, a problem weed in New Zealand native forest remnants.
Summary: Growth, sun/shade acclimation and nitrogen nutrition were examined in Tradescantia fluminensis to gain greater understanding of why this species is so successful in New Zealand native forestExpand
Effects of climate and land use change on invasive species: A case study of Tradescantia fluminensis (Vell.) in New Zealand
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References

SHOWING 1-4 OF 4 REFERENCES
Tradescantia fluminensis in a Manawatu (New Zealand) forest. I: Growth and effects on regeneration
TLDR
There was a significant negative relationship between presence of Tradescantia and presence of native tree seedlings, indicating that regeneration of natives may be inhibited by the dense ground cover of TrADES, which has established in many lowland native forest remnants in New Zealand. Expand
Tradescantia fluminensis in a Manawatu (New Zealand) forest: II. Management by herbicides
TLDR
Paquat at 2 kg active ingredient per ha reduced the standing crop of Tradescantia by over 50% within 10 weeks and damaged seven species of native plant, but this does not necessarily prevent it bemg useful for controlling TradesCantia in small forest remnants. Expand
Botany Division, DSIR, Christchurch. 1365p. APPENDIX I Vascular Plants of forest patch 'Rangitawa
  • Flora of New Zealand
  • 1988
Flora of New Zealand, Vol IV, Botany Division, DSIR, Christchurch. 1365p
  • 1988