MECHANISMS OF LARGE‐SCALE EVOLUTIONARY TRENDS

@article{McShea1994MECHANISMSOL,
  title={MECHANISMS OF LARGE‐SCALE EVOLUTIONARY TRENDS},
  author={D. W. McShea},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1994},
  volume={48}
}
  • D. W. McShea
  • Published 1994
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
  • Large‐scale evolutionary trends may result from driving forces or from passive diffusion in bounded spaces. Such trends are persistent directional changes in higher taxa spanning significant periods of geological time; examples include the frequently cited long‐term trends in size, complexity, and fitness in life as a whole, as well as trends in lesser supraspecific taxa and trends in space. In a driven trend, the distribution mean increases on account of a force (which may manifest itself as a… CONTINUE READING
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