MATING SYSTEM AND SEXCUL DIMORPHISM IN LARGE TERRESTRIAL, MAMMALIAN HERBIVORES

@article{Jarman1983MATINGSA,
  title={MATING SYSTEM AND SEXCUL DIMORPHISM IN LARGE TERRESTRIAL, MAMMALIAN HERBIVORES},
  author={Peter J. Jarman},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1983},
  volume={58}
}
  • P. Jarman
  • Published 1 November 1983
  • Environmental Science
  • Biological Reviews
Sexual dimorphism in mammals is not entirely satisfactorily explained by the models that are advanced to account for it among birds. This may be because species‐specific styles of being dimorphic, and of attaining mature dimorphic state, are not clearly recognized. Mature dimorphism is a syndrome involving body size, appearance and weaponry; each facet and the whole syndrome may have functions in both fighting and signalling. The mature dimorphic stage has to be reached by growth and change… 

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