MATHEMATICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE GENEALOGICAL SPECIES CONCEPT

@article{Hudson2002MATHEMATICALCO,
  title={MATHEMATICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE GENEALOGICAL SPECIES CONCEPT},
  author={R. Hudson and J. Coyne},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={56}
}
Abstract A genealogical species is defined as a basal group of organisms whose members are all more closely related to each other than they are to any organisms outside the group (“exclusivity'), and which contains no exclusive group within it. In practice, a pair of species is so defined when phylogenies of alleles from a sample of loci shows them to be reciprocally monophyletic at all or some specified fraction of the loci. We investigate the length of time it takes to attain this status when… Expand
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TLDR
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