• Corpus ID: 127085185

MANAGING (IN)VISIBILITY BY A DOUBLE MINORITY: DISSIMULATION AND IDENTITY MAINTENANCE AMONG ALEVI BULGARIAN TURKS

@inproceedings{Szer2013MANAGINGB,
  title={MANAGING (IN)VISIBILITY BY A DOUBLE MINORITY: DISSIMULATION AND IDENTITY MAINTENANCE AMONG ALEVI BULGARIAN TURKS},
  author={Hande S{\"o}zer},
  year={2013}
}
This dissertation focusses on invisibilities of ethno-religious minorities which face cycles of persecutions and severe discrimination in their larger societies. The literature portrays marginalized groups’ visibility either as a requirement for their empowerment or a source of their surveillance. However, I argue that for such groups what matters is not their visibility or invisibility per se but rather their control over it, i.e. to what extent the community members are able to reveal or… 
3 Citations

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