MAMMALIAN EXTINCTIONS IN THE LATE PLEISTOCENE OF NORTHERN EURASIA AND NORTH AMERICA

@article{Stuart1991MAMMALIANEI,
  title={MAMMALIAN EXTINCTIONS IN THE LATE PLEISTOCENE OF NORTHERN EURASIA AND NORTH AMERICA},
  author={Anthony J. Stuart},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1991},
  volume={66}
}
  • A. Stuart
  • Published 1991
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Biological Reviews
The ‘mass extinctions’ at the end of the Pleistocene were unique, both in the Pleistocene and earlier in the geological record, in that the species lost were nearly all large terrestrial mammals. Although a global phenomenon, late Pleistocene extinctions were most severe in North America, South America and Australia, and moderate in northern Eurasia (Europe plus Soviet Asia). In Africa, where nearly all of the late Pleistocene ‘megafauna’ survives to the present day, losses were slight. 
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