MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION OF SOLAR KERATOSES TO SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

@article{Marks1988MALIGNANTTO,
  title={MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION OF SOLAR KERATOSES TO SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA},
  author={Robert Marks and George E. Rennie and Thomas S. Selwood},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1988},
  volume={331},
  pages={795-797}
}
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The high prevalence and incidence of malignant and pre-malignant skin lesions in this random sample raise major public health concerns and challenges conventional views about the need for routine treatment of these lesions.
Malignant transformation from actinic keratoses to squamous cell carcinomas.
TLDR
A perspective on the relative risk of malignant transformation in AKs compared with normal skin is presented and the ability to identify high-risk areas of human tissue is exceptionally useful and unusual in medicine.
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It is difficult to distinguish between both actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma and perhaps a classification system for actinic Keratosis including early in situ SCC type AK1, earlyIn situ S CC type AK2 and in situSCC type actinickeratosis is needed.
Epidemiology of actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinoma.
  • S. Salasche
  • Medicine
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
  • 2000
TLDR
AKs are a reliable marker for those people most predisposed to development of an invasive SCC and are probably an early stage in a biologic continuum that culminates in SCC.
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Solar keratoses and naevi were independently predictive of increased melanoma risk and the fact that these 2 phenotypes were found to be negatively associated suggests that susceptibility to melanoma may be expressed via 2 distinct cutaneous phenotypes which may be genetically determined.
The importance of early diagnosis and treatment of actinic keratosis.
The Majority of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas Arise in Actinic Keratoses
TLDR
Actinic keratoses need to be removed before they turn into SCCs, and the prognostic significance of ulceration of cutaneous S CCs needs to be determined.
Actinic Keratosis and Squamous Cell Carcinoma
TLDR
It is difficult to distinguish between both actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma and perhaps a classification system for actinic Keratosis including early in situ SCC type AK1, earlyIn situ S CC type AK2 and in situSCC type actinickeratosis is needed.
Progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma revisited: clinical and treatment implications.
TLDR
Although the rate of progression over time remains to be determined by large prospective studies, actinic keratosis is a marker for an increased rate of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), even in the absence of specific lesion progression.
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