Māyā and radical particularity: Can particular persons be one with Brahman?

@article{SimoniWastila2002MyAR,
  title={Māyā and radical particularity: Can particular persons be one with Brahman?},
  author={Henry Simoni-Wastila},
  journal={International Journal of Hindu Studies},
  year={2002},
  volume={6},
  pages={1-18}
}
  • H. Simoni-Wastila
  • Published 1 April 2002
  • Philosophy
  • International Journal of Hindu Studies
2 Citations

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