Lythrum and Peplis from the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic of North America and Eurasia: new evidence suggesting early diversification within the Lythraceae.

@article{Grmsson2011LythrumAP,
  title={Lythrum and Peplis from the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic of North America and Eurasia: new evidence suggesting early diversification within the Lythraceae.},
  author={Friðgeir Gr{\'i}msson and Reinhard Zetter and Christa-Charlotte Hofmann},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2011},
  volume={98 11},
  pages={
          1801-15
        }
}
PREMISE OF THE STUDY To fully understand the evolution of today's angiosperms, the fossil record of plant families and genera must be used to determine their time of origin and phytogeographic history. As within many angiosperm families, the interrelationships of extant Lythraceae are hard to resolve without sufficient data from the geological past. Here we establish the earliest fossil occurrences of Lythraceae and start resolving the interrelationships and evolution of two of its genera… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Diverse fossil Onagraceae pollen from a Miocene palynoflora of north-east China: early steps in resolving the phytogeographic history of the family
TLDR
Combined morphological features obtained by use of light and scanning electron microscopy have enabled assignment of fossil Onag raceae pollen to extant genera, and therefore tracing of the origin and past distributions of extant Onagraceae lineages is traced.
Fossil pollen from early Palaeogene sediments in western India provides phylogenetic insights into divergence history and pollen character evolution in the pantropical family Ebenaceae
TLDR
Six Ebenaceae-type fossil pollen grains from early Palaeogene sediments of western India are identified and a Gondwanan origin for the family during the mid-Cretaceous is suggested and the boreotropical and ‘out of India’ dispersal hypotheses are supported as the most probable explanations for the present global distribution of the family.
Tiny pollen grains: first evidence of Saururaceae from the Late Cretaceous of western North America
TLDR
Comparison with re-investigated pollen from the Eocene of North America, the Miocene of Europe, and modern species of the family shows that pollen morphology in Saururaceae is highly conservative, and remained largely unchanged for the last 80 million years.
Fagaceae pollen from the early Cenozoic of West Greenland: revisiting Engler’s and Chaney’s Arcto-Tertiary hypotheses
TLDR
Comparison with coeval or older mid-latitude records of modern lineages of Fagaceae shows thatmodern lineages found in western Greenland and Axel Heiberg likely originated at lower latitudes, corroborate earlier findings that Fag growers were a dominant element at high latitudes during the early Cenozoic.
Eocene Loranthaceae pollen pushes back divergence ages for major splits in the family
TLDR
The fossil Loranthaceae pollen document the presence of at least one extant root-parasitic lineage (Nuytsieae) and two currently aerial parasitic lineages by the end of the Eocene in the Northern Hemisphere.
Fossil Records in the Lythraceae
  • S. Graham
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    The Botanical Review
  • 2012
TLDR
Diversification of the Lythraceae occurred primarily during two major periods of global temperature change, during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum and from the middle Miocene forward when temperatures decreased markedly and seasonality and dry-adapted vegetation types became more prominent.
Combined LM and SEM study of the middle Miocene (Sarmatian) palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin, Austria: part III. Magnoliophyta 1 – Magnoliales to Fabales
Abstract Previous studies on the palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin show that it contains a rich assemblage of spores and gymnosperm pollen. Present and ongoing investigations of dispersed
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 50 REFERENCES
Upper Cretaceous sulcate pollen from the Timerdyakh Formation, Vilui Basin (Siberia)
Abstract One inaperturate and 16 monosulcate pollen types are described from the latest Campanian to earliest Maastrichtian sediments of the Vilui basin, Siberia, using both light and scanning
PALYNOLOGY AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE LYTHRACEAE. III. GENERA PHYSOCALYMMA THROUGH WOODFORDIA, ADDENDA, AND CONCLUSIONS.
TLDR
Pollen of the 27 genera presently recognized as comprising the family Lythraceae have been surveyed with light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, revealing the family is revealed as the most diverse palynologically of the order Myrtales.
Lagerstroemia (Lythraceae) pollen from the Miocene of eastern China
TLDR
The occurrence of Lagerstroemia together with some temperate plants at the fossil site suggests that the climate in eastern China during the Miocene was similar to that of today.
Pollen, fruits, and leaves of Tetracentron (Trochodendraceae) from the Cainozoic of Iceland and western North America and their palaeobiogeographic implications
Dispersed pollen, fruits, and leaves of Tetracentron (Trochodendraceae) are described from the Miocene of Iceland and assigned to a new species, Tetracentron atlanticum. The Icelandic fossils
The geologic history of the Lythraceae
TLDR
The paleobotanical record supports current concepts concerning phylogenetic relationships among genera of the Lythraceae, and the family apparently had an Old World origin and became differentiated into a distinct modern taxon during Paleocene and early Eocene time.
Upper Cretaceous pollen flora from the Vilui Basin, Siberia: Circumpolar and endemic Aquilapollenites, Manicorpus, and Azonia species
A detailed LM and SEM examination of the Upper Cretaceous Timerdyakh Formation microflora from the Vilui Basin yielded 13 Aquilapollenites, two Manicorpus, and three Azonia species. Comparisons with
Combined LM and SEM study of the Middle Miocene (Sarmatian) palynoflora from the Lavanttal Basin, Austria: Part I. Bryophyta, Lycopodiophyta, Pteridophyta, Ginkgophyta, and Gnetophyta
TLDR
Preliminary results suggest that the vegetation thrived under a relatively warm and humid climate and seems to represent part of azonal vegetation with plants growing in swamps, on hummocks, along border of lakes or streams, on levees, or on sandy patches of floodplains.
Interfamilial Relationships in Myrtales: Molecular Phylogeny and Patterns of Morphological Evolution
TLDR
The rbcL sequences of 50 taxa were analyzed using parsimony and maximum likelihood to provide a phylogenetic hypothesis of intraordi- nal relationships in Myrtales and suggest branch support for the basal split of Myrtale is weak.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...