LysM-Type Mycorrhizal Receptor Recruited for Rhizobium Symbiosis in Nonlegume Parasponia

@article{OpdenCamp2011LysMTypeMR,
  title={LysM-Type Mycorrhizal Receptor Recruited for Rhizobium Symbiosis in Nonlegume Parasponia},
  author={Rik Op den Camp and Arend Streng and St{\'e}phane De Mita and Qing-qin Cao and Elisa Polone and Wei Liu and Jetty Siva S Ammiraju and Dave Kudrna and Rod A. Wing and Andreas Untergasser and Ton Bisseling and Ren{\'e} Geurts},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={331},
  pages={909 - 912}
}
Parasponia uses a mycorrhizal signaling receptor essential for arbuscle formation to control rhizobium nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium–root nodule symbiosis is generally considered to be unique for legumes. However, there is one exception, and that is Parasponia. In this nonlegume, the rhizobial nodule symbiosis evolved independently and is, as in legumes, induced by rhizobium Nod factors. We used Parasponia andersonii to identify genetic constraints underlying evolution of Nod factor signaling… Expand
Nonlegume Parasponia andersonii deploys a broad rhizobium host range strategy resulting in largely variable symbiotic effectiveness.
TLDR
It was found that Parasponia andersonii can be nodulated by a broad range of rhizobia belonging to four different genera, and it is concluded that this non-legume is highly promiscuous for rhizobial engagement. Expand
Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling
TLDR
The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod Factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factors signaling. Expand
The LysM receptor-like kinase SlLYK10 regulates the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tomato.
TLDR
The hypothesis that the SILYK10 ancestral gene originally played a role in AM and underwent duplication and neofunctionalization for a roles in nodulation in legumes is supported and VIGS is concluded to be an efficient method for fast screening of genes playing major roles in AM. Expand
Are common symbiosis genes required for endophytic rice-rhizobial interactions?
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the common Sym genes are not required for endophytic colonization of rice roots by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Expand
Lipo-chitooligosaccharide signaling in endosymbiotic plant-microbe interactions.
TLDR
These studies show that structurally related signals and the LysM receptor family are key components of both nodulation and mycorrhization, and raises questions of how legume plants discriminate fungal and bacterial endosymbionts from pathogenic microorganisms. Expand
Rhizobium–legume symbiosis shares an exocytotic pathway required for arbuscule formation
TLDR
It is shown that two highly homologous exocytotic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) are required for formation of the symbiotic membrane interface in both endosymbiotic interactions, and identification of these VAMP72s as common symbiotic regulators in exocytic vesicles trafficking suggests that the ancient exocyTotic pathway forming the periarbuscular membrane compartment has also been coopted in the Rhizobium–legume symbiosis. Expand
Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit1
TLDR
It is demonstrated that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far. Expand
Intraradical colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi triggers induction of a lipochitooligosaccharide receptor
TLDR
It is shown that divergence of Lys11 and Nfr5 LysM receptor kinase paralogs of Lotus japonicus has affected their specificity for lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) decorations, while the innate capacity to recognize and induce a downstream signalling after perception of rhizobial LCOs was maintained. Expand
Nod factor signaling in symbiotic nodulation
TLDR
Following extensive research, the mechanisms of perception and transduction of the NF signal by the legume host are understood better and it is suggested that the NF biosynthesis pathway evolved from non rhizobial bacteria and that NF perception/signaling in legumes adapted components preexisting in plant signaling pathways controlling in particular the establishment of the more ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Expand
Nonlegumes Respond to Rhizobial Nod Factors by Suppressing the Innate Immune Response
TLDR
Surprisingly, Liang et al. found that several nonleguminous plants, including Arabidopsis, tomato, and corn, were able to respond to the same Nod factors that initiate the microbial symbiosis in soybean. Expand
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