Lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals show aberrant inositol polyphosphate metabolism which reverses after zidovudine therapy.

Abstract

Lymphocytes or lymphoblastoid cells that have been infected by HIV in vitro or exposed to its envelope glycoprotein (gp120) show abnormal inositol polyphosphate-mediated signal transduction and associated defects in calcium regulation. Such cells behave as though they were chronically activated and fail to respond to further activating signals. We now show that similar changes are seen in lymphocytes obtained from HIV-infected subjects at various stages of infection, despite the fact that only a minority of such cells are infected. Furthermore, the defect in the phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis pathway in lymphocytes obtained from AIDS patients reverses after treatment with zidovudine, in parallel with improvements in phytohaemagglutinin-induced proliferative response and interferon-gamma production.

Cite this paper

@article{Nye1991LymphocytesFH, title={Lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals show aberrant inositol polyphosphate metabolism which reverses after zidovudine therapy.}, author={Keith E Nye and Kirstine A Knox and Anthony J Pinching}, journal={AIDS}, year={1991}, volume={5 4}, pages={413-7} }