Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection.

@article{Stahl2006LycopenerichPA,
  title={Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection.},
  author={Wilhelm Stahl and Ulrike Heinrich and Olivier Aust and Hagen Prof. Dr. Tronnier and Helmut Sies},
  journal={Photochemical \& photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={5 2},
  pages={
          238-42
        }
}
  • W. Stahl, U. Heinrich, +2 authors H. Sies
  • Published 2006
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Photochemical & photobiological sciences : Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
Plant constituents such as carotenoids and flavonoids are involved in the light-protecting system in plants and contribute to the prevention of UV damage in humans. As micronutrients they are ingested with the diet and are distributed into light-exposed tissues where they provide systemic photoprotection. beta-Carotene is an endogenous photoprotector, and its efficacy to prevent UV-induced erythema formation has been demonstrated in intervention studies. Lycopene is the major carotenoid of the… Expand
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