Lungfish neural characters and their bearing on sarcopterygian phylogeny

@article{Northcutt1986LungfishNC,
  title={Lungfish neural characters and their bearing on sarcopterygian phylogeny},
  author={R. Glenn Northcutt},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={1986},
  volume={190}
}
The phylogenetic affinity of lungfishes has been disputed since their discovery, and they have variously been considered the sister group of actinistians, the sister group of amphibians, or equally related to actinopterygians and crossopterygians. Previous discussions of these hypotheses have considered neural characters, but there has been no general survey of the nervous systems of sarcopterygians that examines the bearing of neural characters on these hypotheses in the context of a cladistic… Expand
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