Lung Cancer Incidence and Long-Term Exposure to Air Pollution from Traffic

@article{RaaschouNielsen2011LungCI,
  title={Lung Cancer Incidence and Long-Term Exposure to Air Pollution from Traffic},
  author={Ole Raaschou-Nielsen and Zorana Jovanovic Andersen and Martin Hvidberg and Steen Solvang Jensen and Matthias Ketzel and Mette S{\o}rensen and Steffen Loft and Kim Overvad and Anne Tj{\o}nneland},
  journal={Environmental Health Perspectives},
  year={2011},
  volume={119},
  pages={860 - 865}
}
Background Previous studies have shown associations between air pollution and risk for lung cancer. Objective We investigated whether traffic and the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence are associated with risk for lung cancer. Methods We identified 592 lung cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry among 52,970 members of the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort and traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 in the Central Population Registry. We calculated the NOx… 
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