Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. III. The Yellow and Red Supergiants and Post-Red Supergiant Evolution

@article{Gordon2016LuminousAV,
  title={Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. III. The Yellow and Red Supergiants and Post-Red Supergiant Evolution},
  author={M. Gordon and R. Humphreys and T. Jones},
  journal={arXiv: Solar and Stellar Astrophysics},
  year={2016}
}
Recent supernova and transient surveys have revealed an increasing number of non-terminal stellar eruptions. Though the progenitor class of these eruptions includes the most luminous stars, little is known of the pre-supernova mechanics of massive stars in their most evolved state, thus motivating a census of possible progenitors. From surveys of evolved and unstable luminous star populations in nearby galaxies, we select a sample of yellow and red supergiant candidates in M31 and M33 for… Expand
Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. IV. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, B[e] Supergiants, and the Warm Hypergiants: How to Tell Them Apart
In this series of papers we have presented the results of a spectroscopic survey of luminous stars in the nearby spirals M31 and M33. Here, we present spectroscopy of 132 additional stars. Most haveExpand
Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33 V. The Upper HR Diagram
We present HR Diagrams for the massive star populations in M31 and M33 including several different types of emission-line stars: the confirmed Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), candidate LBVs, B[e]Expand
Monitoring Luminous Yellow Massive Stars in M33: New Yellow Hypergiant Candidates
The evolution of massive stars surviving the red supergiant (RSG) stage remains unexplored due to the rarity of such objects. The yellow hypergiants (YHGs) appear to be the warm counterparts ofExpand
Luminous blue variable candidates in M31
We study five Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) candidates in the Andromeda galaxy and one more (MN112) in the Milky Way. We obtain the same-epoch near-infrared (NIR) and optical spectra on the 3.5-meterExpand
A Census of B[e] Supergiants
Stellar evolution theory is most uncertain for massive stars. For reliable predictions of the evolution of massive stars and their final fate, solid constraints on the physical parameters, and theirExpand
The luminosities of cool supergiants in the Magellanic Clouds, and the Humphreys-Davidson limit revisited
The empirical upper luminosity boundary Lmax of cool supergiants (SGs), often referred to as the Humphreys-Davidson limit, is thought to encode information on the general mass-loss behaviour ofExpand
Massive stars in the Tarantula Nebula: A Rosetta Stone for Extragalactic Supergiant HII Regions
A review of the properties of the Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is presented, primarily from the perspective of its massive star content. The proximity of the TarantulaExpand
Luminous and Variable Stars in NGC 2403 and M81
We present the results of spectroscopy and multi-wavelength photometry of luminous and variable star candidates in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 2403 and M81. We discuss specific classes of stars,Expand
Evolutionary models of red supergiants: Evidence for a metallicity-dependent mixing length and implications for Type IIP supernova progenitors
Recent studies on the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) in the local universe provide us with an excellent observational constraint on RSG models. We calibrate the mixing length parameter byExpand
On the evolutionary state of massive stars in transition phases in M33
The advanced stages of several high-mass stars are characterized by episodic mass loss shed during phases of instability. Key for assigning these stars a proper evolutionary state is to assess theExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. II. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, Fe II Emission Line Stars, and Other Supergiants
An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and theirExpand
LUMINOUS AND VARIABLE STARS IN M31 AND M33. I. THE WARM HYPERGIANTS AND POST-RED SUPERGIANT EVOLUTION*
The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 M ☉, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperaturesExpand
Studies of luminous stars in nearby galaxies. III. Comments on the evolution of the most massive stars in the Milky Way and the large magellanic cloud
An empirical comparison of the observed H-R diagrams for the supergiants in our region of the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud reveals comparable distributions of spectral types and luminositiesExpand
A NEW CLASS OF LUMINOUS TRANSIENTS AND A FIRST CENSUS OF THEIR MASSIVE STELLAR PROGENITORS
The progenitors of SN 2008S and the 2008 luminous transient in NGC 300 were deeply dust-enshrouded massive stars, with extremely red mid-infrared (MIR) colors and relatively low bolometricExpand
A Spectroscopic Survey of Massive Stars in M31 and M33
We describe our spectroscopic follow-up to the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS) photometry of M31 and M33. We have obtained new spectroscopy of 1895 stars, allowing us to classify 1496 of them forExpand
Yellow Supergiants in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31)
The yellow supergiant content of nearby galaxies can provide a critical test of stellar evolution theory, bridging the gap between the hot, massive stars and the cool red supergiants. But, thisExpand
A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. III. A Search for Luminous Blue Variables and Other Hα Emission-Line Stars*
We describe a search for Hα emission-line stars in M31, M33, and seven dwarfs in or near the Local Group (IC 10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus, and the Phoenix dwarf) usingExpand
THE YELLOW AND RED SUPERGIANTS OF M33
Yellow and red supergiants are evolved massive stars whose numbers and locations on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram can provide a stringent test for models of massive star evolution. PreviousExpand
Discovery of Candidate Luminous Blue Variables in M31
Luminous blue variables (LBVs) constitute a short-lived, eruptive phase in the evolution of some of the most massive stars. Only a handful have yet been identified in the Galaxy and in each of theExpand
Observational Constraints on the Progenitors of Core-Collapse Supernovae: The Case for Missing High-Mass Stars
  • S. Smartt
  • Physics
  • Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia
  • 2015
Abstract Over the last 15 years, the supernova community has endeavoured to directly identify progenitor stars for core-collapse supernovae discovered in nearby galaxies. These precursors are oftenExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...