Luke-Acts and the Imperial Cult: A Way Through the Conundrum?

@article{Rowe2005LukeActsAT,
  title={Luke-Acts and the Imperial Cult: A Way Through the Conundrum?},
  author={Christopher Kavin Rowe},
  journal={Journal for the Study of the New Testament},
  year={2005},
  volume={27},
  pages={279 - 300}
}
  • C. Rowe
  • Published 1 March 2005
  • History
  • Journal for the Study of the New Testament
This article points out the serious difficulties inherent in trying to relate Luke-Acts to the imperial cult. Having acknowledged such difficulties, the attempt is made nonetheless to relate concretely Luke-Acts to the cult on the basis of the significance of Acts 10.36 for Luke-Acts as a whole and its potential impact upon auditors in the ancient Mediterranean world. The implications of this impact are then addressed and a material connection to other early Christian evidence is tentatively… 

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