Lower than expected morbidity and mortality for an Australian Aboriginal population: 10‐year follow‐up in a decentralised community

@article{Rowley2008LowerTE,
  title={Lower than expected morbidity and mortality for an Australian Aboriginal population: 10‐year follow‐up in a decentralised community},
  author={Kevin G. Rowley and Kerin O'dea and Ian P S Anderson and Robyn Mcdermott and Karmananda Saraswati and Ricky Tilmouth and Iris Roberts and Joseph W Fitz and Zaimin Wang and Alicia B. Jenkins and James D. Best and Zhiqiang Wang and Alex Dh Brown},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2008},
  volume={188}
}
Objective: To examine mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease (CVD), and CVD hospitalisation rate for a decentralised Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory. 
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