Lower gastrointestinal bleeding

@article{Vernava1997LowerGB,
  title={Lower gastrointestinal bleeding},
  author={A. Vernava and B. Moore and W. Longo and F. Johnson},
  journal={Diseases of the Colon \& Rectum},
  year={1997},
  volume={40},
  pages={846-858}
}
BACKGROUND: Lower gastrointestinal bleeding can be a confusing clinical conundrum, the satisfactory evaluation and management of which requires a disciplined and orderly approach. Diagnosis and management has evolved with the development of new technology such as selective mesenteric angiography and colonoscopy. PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to review the available data in the literature and to determine the current optimum method of evaluation and management of lower gastrointestinal… Expand
Lower GI bleeding: epidemiology and diagnosis.
  • L. Strate
  • Medicine
  • Gastroenterology clinics of North America
  • 2005
TLDR
The management of LGIB is challenging because of the diverse range of bleeding sources, the large extent of bowel involved, the intermittent nature of bleeding, and the various complicated and often invasive investigative modalities. Expand
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This article reviews the current therapeutic options in surgical and endoscopic management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding and suggests that successful therapy depends on the precise preoperative localization of the bleeding source, which may not be possible in some cases. Expand
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TLDR
Investigation of the source of the bleed usually proceeds with routine endoscopic and radiological studies, followed by elective segmental resection, if indicated, and on occasions, it may be impossible to determine the precise location and etiology and this forces both physician and patient to await the next bleeding episode. Expand
Epidemiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • G. Zuccaro
  • Medicine
  • Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology
  • 2008
TLDR
Determining the precise impact of colonoscopy on the outcome of lower GI bleeding is difficult due to the retrospective nature of many studies, and the frequent inability to definitively establish the exact bleeding site. Expand
Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Is Urgent Colonoscopy Necessary for All Hematochezia?
  • B. Jang
  • Medicine
  • Clinical endoscopy
  • 2013
TLDR
Urgent colonoscopy is difficult to control, and showed no evidence of improving clinical outcomes or lowering costs as compared with routine elective Colonoscopy. Expand
Treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage
TLDR
Abdominal arteriography may localize gastrointestinal bleeding sources in approximately one-third of cases and selective embolization may provide definitive hemostasis in most instances. Expand
Management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding.
TLDR
In most cases, bleeding from the colon and rectum is self-limiting and requires no specific therapy, and risk stratification using stigmata of haemorrhage is gaining more importance. Expand
Colonoscopic management of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage
  • J. Terdiman
  • Medicine
  • Current gastroenterology reports
  • 2001
TLDR
It appears that clinical and colonoscopic data may be combined in an effort to predict outcome and suggest optimal length of stay, and therapeutic colonoscopy can arrest or prevent bleeding in certain high-risk patients, offering the opportunity to change the natural history of the bleed. Expand
Acute lower intestinal bleeding
Validating that a lesion found during diagnostic testing is the definite source of blood loss is a problem that characterizes much of the literature about lower intestinal bleeding. Attempts haveExpand
The role of endoscopy in managing acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • C. Gostout
  • Medicine
  • The New England journal of medicine
  • 2000
TLDR
The study has two key messages: that the endoscopic findings that characterize recent hemorrhage, routinely used in the evaluation of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, are also useful in establishing the diagnosis in a subgroup of patients with colonic diverticular hemorrhage. Expand
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Angiography is useful and worthwhile in the work-up of patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding in an attempt to plan localized, definitive resection, and this may lead to a lower mortality rate. Expand
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