Low-molecular-weight heparin versus a coumarin for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer.

@article{Lee2003LowmolecularweightHV,
  title={Low-molecular-weight heparin versus a coumarin for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer.},
  author={Agnes Y.Y. Lee and Mark Norman Levine and Ross I. Baker and Chris J. Bowden and Ajay K Kakkar and Martin H. Prins and Frederick R. Rickles and Jim A. Julian and Susan Haley and Michael J Kovacs and Michael Gent},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={349 2},
  pages={
          146-53
        }
}
BACKGROUND Patients with cancer have a substantial risk of recurrent thrombosis despite the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. We compared the efficacy of a low-molecular-weight heparin with that of an oral anticoagulant agent in preventing recurrent thrombosis in patients with cancer. METHODS Patients with cancer who had acute, symptomatic proximal deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or both were randomly assigned to receive low-molecular-weight heparin (dalteparin) at a dose of 200 IU… Expand

Paper Mentions

Observational Clinical Trial
The primary objective is to assess the safety and efficacy of switching from direct oral anticoagulants to low molecular weight heparin in cancer patients during antineoplastic… Expand
ConditionsAtrial Fibrillation, Cancer
InterventionDrug
Observational Clinical Trial
Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) are the reference molecule for the long term treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients but remains, however, associated with a… Expand
ConditionsNeoplasms, Venous Thromboembolism
Selecting an anticoagulant for recurrent venous thromboembolism in cancer.
  • S. Goodin
  • Medicine
  • American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
  • 2005
TLDR
Results of recent trials support the concept that antithrombotic therapy with dalteparin or nadroparin may have an antineoplastic effect, resulting in improved survival time, however, these results require further validation. Expand
Anti-Xa effect of a low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin) does not accumulate in extended duration therapy for venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.
TLDR
For patients with active cancer receiving extended duration therapy with low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin) there is no accumulation of anti-Xa effect over the first month of therapy. Expand
Low-molecular-weight-heparin versus a coumarin for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism in high- and low-risk patients with active cancer: a post hoc analysis of the CLOT Study
TLDR
In patients with cancer-associated thrombosis at high risk of rVTE and bleeding, the low-molecular-weight-heparin dalteparin was more effective than VKA in reducing the risk ofRVTE without increasing therisk of bleeding. Expand
Cancer-associated thrombosis: focus on extended therapy with dalteparin.
  • R. Bick
  • Medicine
  • The journal of supportive oncology
  • 2006
TLDR
Extended LMWH therapy with dalteparin represents an alternative to standard oral anticoagulation and is supported by the latest practice guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians, although the question of whether long-term treatment with LMWH in cancer patients actually affects survival apart from the benefits of thromboprophylaxis remains to be answered. Expand
Randomized comparison of low molecular weight heparin and coumarin derivatives on the survival of patients with cancer and venous thromboembolism.
  • A. Lee, F. Rickles, +6 authors M. Levine
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2005
TLDR
The use of dalteparin relative to coumarin derivatives was associated with improved survival in patients with solid tumors who did not have metastatic disease at the time of an acute venous thromboembolic event. Expand
Long-term low-molecular-weight heparin versus usual care in proximal-vein thrombosis patients with cancer.
TLDR
The findings confirm the limited but benchmark data in the literature that long-term low-molecular-weight heparin is more effective than vitamin-K-antagonist therapy for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer and proximal venousThrombosis. Expand
Tinzaparin vs warfarin for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism in patients with active cancer: A randomized clinical trial
TLDR
The use of full-dose tinzaparin (175 IU/kg) daily compared with warfarin for 6 months did not significantly reduce the composite measure of recurrent VTE and was not associated with reductions in overall mortality or major bleeding, but was associated with a lower rate of clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Expand
Edoxaban for the Treatment of Cancer‐Associated Venous Thromboembolism
TLDR
Oral edoxaban was noninferior to subcutaneous dalteparin with respect to the composite outcome of recurrent venous thromboembolism or major bleeding during the 12 months after randomization, regardless of treatment duration. Expand
Vitamin K Antagonists After 6 Months of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin in Cancer Patients with Venous Thromboembolism.
TLDR
In cancer patients with venous thromboembolism who completed 6 months of LMWH therapy, switching to VKA was associated with a similar risk of venousThrombosis recurrences or bleeding when compared with patients who continued LMWH. Expand
Low molecular weight heparins as extended prophylaxis against recurrent thrombosis in cancer patients.
TLDR
Evidence indicates that long-term prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) is an effective and safe alternative to oral anticoagulation in patients with VTE and cancer, reducing the risk for recurrent VTE by up to 52%. Expand
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