Low level of extrapair parentage in wild zebra finches

@article{Griffith2010LowLO,
  title={Low level of extrapair parentage in wild zebra finches},
  author={Simon C. Griffith and Clare Ellen Holleley and Mylene M. Mariette and Sarah Rosalind Pryke and Nina Svedin},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2010},
  volume={79},
  pages={261-264}
}
Post-copulatory sexual selection and the Zebra Finch
TLDR
The outcome of sperm competition in the Zebra Finch and other birds is best predicted by the passive sperm loss model, allowing for differences in sperm numbers and quality (fertilising capacity); last male sperm precedence is not a ‘rule’ in birds but is a consequence of the way sperm competition experiments have been conducted.
Intra-specific variance in sperm morphometry: a comparison between wild and domesticated Zebra Finches Taeniopygia guttata
TLDR
The results validate the use of domesticated Zebra Finches for further studies of postcopulatory sexual selection and sperm competition, and found significant differences between the three populations for certain sperm traits, but variance in sperm morphometry did not differ between the domesticated and the wild Zebra Finch populations.
The size and composition of social groups in the wild zebra finch
TLDR
The group size and composition of free-ranging zebra finches during two brief non-breeding periods near semipermanent water sources in the arid zone of Australia indicate the central importance of the pair bond, even during periods outside of active breeding.
The colour of paternity: extra‐pair paternity in the wild Gouldian finch does not appear to be driven by genetic incompatibility between morphs
TLDR
This study aimed to examine the patterns of parentage and sex ratio bias with respect to colour pairing combinations in a wild population of the Gouldian finch and found no effect of pairing combinations on patterns of extra‐pair paternity, offspring sex ratio or selection on morphs in nestlings.
Breeding Experience, Alternative Reproductive Strategies and Reproductive Success in a Captive Colony of Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata)
TLDR
Evidence is provided that older females with prior breeding experience are quicker to initiate a clutch with a new partner and have increased success in chick rearing, even in a captive colony of zebra finches with minimal foraging demands and the use of alternative reproductive strategies is associated with previous failed breeding attempts with the same pair partner.
Sperm Length Variation as a Predictor of Extrapair Paternity in Passerine Birds
TLDR
The CVbm index is proposed as an alternative measure to extrapair paternity for passerine birds Given the ease of sperm extraction from male birds in breeding condition, and a modest number of sampled males required for a robust estimate, this new index holds a great potential for mapping the risk of sperm competition across a wide range of passerine Birds.
Maternal effects in the Zebra Finch: a model mother reviewed
TLDR
This extensive collection of work on the Zebra Finch provides useful general insight into the patterns of maternal investment in birds and the effects on offspring phenotype.
Revisiting the evidence for inbreeding avoidance in zebra finches
TLDR
It is suggested that zebra finches avoid inbreeding only if birds can keep track of their kin, and is discussed implications for the design of follow-up studies.
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References

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Sperm competition in the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata
Sexual selection and extrapair fertilization in a socially monogamous passerine, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia gullata)
TLDR
Results suggest that males place greater effort into seeking fertile versus infertile EPCs and that unattractive males accrue fitness gains through high parental investment (PI), whereas attractive males benefit through decreased PI and increased allocation to EPF.
Extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in wild zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, revealed by DNA fingerprinting
TLDR
Behavioural observations show that EPP occurs through extra-pair copulation rather than rapid mate switching in a wild population of zebra finches, and is discussed in the light of what is known about the fertile period and sperm precedence patterns in this species.
Male phenotype and ejaculate quality in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata
TLDR
It was found that female zebra finches paired to a vasectomized male, and hence receiving no sperm, were no more likely to seek an extra-pair copulation than females paired to an intact male.
Extra-pair copulation and sperm competition in the zebra finch
TLDR
It is shown that EPCs occurring under semi-natural conditions in captivity result in extra-pair paternity, and sperm from the last male to mate has precedence over previous matings: a single EPC occurring last is disproportionately successful in fertilizing eggs, butEPCs followed by further pair copulations have a low probability of success.
Use of nest-boxes by the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata): implications for reproductive success and research
TLDR
The establishment of a breeding population of Zebra Finches using nest- boxes in semi-arid, far-western New South Wales, over three breeding seasons (2005–07), shows the effectiveness of artificial nest-boxes at decreasing levels of predation in the wild and increasing the capacity for research.
Extra pair paternity in birds: a review of interspecific variation and adaptive function
TLDR
The remaining challenges of understanding the relative roles of genes and ecology in determining variation between taxa in the rate of extra paternity are highlighted, and testing for differences between extra‐pair offspring and those sired within‐pair is highlighted.
Evaluating mate choice in the zebra finch
Quasi-parasitism in birds
TLDR
All of the evidence for the occurrence of QP in birds is reviewed and it is found that it is far more limited than generally believed, as many apparent examples may be explained by rapid mate--switching or errors in molecular analysis of parentage.
Genetic effects on sperm design in the zebra finch
TLDR
An extraordinary degree of inter-male variation in sperm design that is independent of sperm swimming velocity is shown in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata, having important implications for the evolution of sperm in other taxa.
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