Low bone mineral density in highly trained male master cyclists

@article{Nichols2003LowBM,
  title={Low bone mineral density in highly trained male master cyclists},
  author={Jeanne Nichols and Jacob E. Palmer and Susan S. Levy},
  journal={Osteoporosis International},
  year={2003},
  volume={14},
  pages={644-649}
}
The purpose of this study was to determine total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) in highly competitive young adult and master male cyclists. Three groups of men were studied: older cyclists (51.2±5.3 years, n=27); young adult cyclists (31.7±3.5 years, n=16); and 24 non-athletes matched by age (±2 years) and body weight (±2 kg) to the master cyclists. All of the master cyclists had been training and racing for a minimum of 10 years (mean 20.2±8.4 years) and engaging in little to no… Expand
Bone density comparisons in male competitive road cyclists and untrained controls.
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Cycling performed throughout adolescence may negatively affect bone health, then compromising the acquisition of peak bone mass, as described in bone status and analyse bone mass in adolescent cyclists. Expand
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Bone Loss Over 1 Year of Training and Competition in Female Cyclists
TLDR
Bone loss in female cyclists was site specific and similar in magnitude to losses previously reported in male cyclists. Expand
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It is confirmed that cycling has no positive effect on BMD, BMD being often lower than in normal controls at the lumbar site; femoral BMD is less concerned. Expand
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