Low bioavailable testosterone levels predict future height loss in postmenopausal women

@article{Jassal1995LowBT,
  title={Low bioavailable testosterone levels predict future height loss in postmenopausal women},
  author={Simerjot Kaur Jassal and Elizabeth Barrett-Connor and Sharon L. Edelstein},
  journal={Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  year={1995},
  volume={10}
}
The objective of this study was to examine the relation of endogenous sex hormones to subsequent height loss in postmenopausal women, in whom height loss is usually a surrogate for osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This was a prospective, community‐based study. The site chosen was Rancho Bernardo, an upper middle class community in Southern California. A total of 170 postmenopausal women participated, aged 55–80 years. None of them were taking exogenous estrogen between 1972 and 1974. Plasma… Expand
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