Low- and high-intensity treadmill exercise attenuates chronic morphine-induced anxiogenesis and memory impairment but not reductions in hippocampal BDNF in female rats.

Abstract

Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that treadmill exercise alleviates the deficits in cognitive functions and anxiety behaviors induced by chronic exposure to morphine in male rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of low and high intensities of treadmill exercise on spatial memory, anxiety-like behaviors, and biochemical changes in the hippocampus and serum of morphine-treated female rats. The adult virgin female rats were injected with bi-daily doses (10mg/kg, at 12h intervals) of morphine over a period of 10days. Following these injections, the rats were exercised under low or high intensities for 30min per session on five days a week for four weeks. After exercise training, object location memory, anxiety profile, hippocampal BDNF, and serum corticosterone and BDNF were examined. Morphine-treated animals exhibited increased anxiety levels, impaired object location memory, and reduced hippocampal BDNF. Exercise alleviated these impairing effects on anxiety profile and memory but not hippocampal BDNF. The high-intensity exercise even further reduced the hippocampal BDNF. Additionally, both exercise regimens in the morphine group and the high exercise in the saline group reduced serum BDNF. Finally, the high-intensity exercise enhanced corticosterone serum. These findings indicate that the negative cognitive and behavioral effects of chronic exposure to morphine could be relieved by forced exercise in female rats. However, the exercise intensity is an important factor to be considered during exercise training. Finally, the correlation between changes of brain and serum BDNF and cognitive functions following morphine exposure needs further research.

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.02.024

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Cite this paper

@article{GhodratiJaldbakhan2017LowAH, title={Low- and high-intensity treadmill exercise attenuates chronic morphine-induced anxiogenesis and memory impairment but not reductions in hippocampal BDNF in female rats.}, author={Shahrbanoo Ghodrati-Jaldbakhan and Ali Ahmadalipour and Ali Rashidy-pour and Abbas Ali Vafaei and Hossein Miladi-Gorji and Maryam Alizadeh}, journal={Brain research}, year={2017}, volume={1663}, pages={20-28} }