Low and high imagers activate networks differentially in mental rotation

@article{Logie2011LowAH,
  title={Low and high imagers activate networks differentially in mental rotation},
  author={Robert H. Logie and Cyril R. Pernet and Antimo Buonocore and Sergio Della Sala},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2011},
  volume={49},
  pages={3071-3077}
}
Hemispheric asymmetries in visual mental imagery
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A critical review of the available literature on the hemispheric laterality of visual mental imagery, by looking at cross-method patterns of evidence in the domains of lesion neuropsychology, neuroimaging, and direct cortical stimulation suggests that visualmental imagery relies on large-scale brain networks, with a crucial participation of high-level visual regions in the temporal lobe.
The neural correlates of visual imagery vividness – An fMRI study and literature review
Different representations and strategies in mental rotation
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Good imagers were more flexible in generating different visual representations, whereas poor imagers applied different strategies under different task demands, suggesting that imagery ability and types of stimuli interact to affect the format of representation and the choice of strategy in performing MR task.
Strengthening spatial reasoning: elucidating the attentional and neural mechanisms associated with mental rotation skill development
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Overall, the current study suggests that effective mental rotation training protocols should aim to improve the encoding and manipulation of mental representations.
Aphantasia: The science of visual imagery extremes.
Two Routes to Expertise in Mental Rotation
TLDR
Novel evidence is found that practice with the large but not the small stimulus set increased the magnitude of an early visual evoked potential, suggesting increased rotation speed is enabled by improved efficiency in extracting three-dimensional information from two-dimensional stimuli.
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