Low-Load Bench Press Training to Fatigue Results in Muscle Hypertrophy Similar to High-Load Bench Press Training

@article{Ogasawara2013LowLoadBP,
  title={Low-Load Bench Press Training to Fatigue Results in Muscle Hypertrophy Similar to High-Load Bench Press Training},
  author={Riki Ogasawara and Jeremy P. Loenneke and Robert S. Thiebaud and Takashi Abe},
  journal={International Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
  year={2013},
  volume={4},
  pages={114-121}
}
The purpose of this study was to determine whether the training responses observed with low-load resistance exercise to volitional fatigue translates into significant muscle hypertrophy, and compare that response to high-load resistance training. Nine previously untrained men (aged 25 [SD 3] years at the beginning of the study, standing height 1.73 [SD 0.07] m, body mass 68.9 [SD 8.1] kg) completed 6-week of high load-resistance training (HL-RT) (75% of one repeti-tion maximal [1RM], 3-sets, 3x… 
Low-Load Resistance Training to Volitional Failure Induces Muscle Hypertrophy Similar to Volume-Matched, Velocity Fatigue
TLDR
Low-load RT to volitional failure induces muscle hypertrophy similar to volume-matched velocity fatigue, but LVoF and LVeF showed enhanced acute responses and greater chronic endurance gains, but lower chronic strength gains than HL.
Effects of High-Load Resistance Training versus Pyramid Training System on Maximal Muscle Strength in Well-Trained Young Men: A Randomized Controlled Study
TLDR
It is suggested that to use a combination of different RT systems over time may help to maintain interest in and motivation to perform RT by allowing a varied RT program.
Effects of Low- vs. High-Load Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men
TLDR
It is indicated that both HL and LL training to failure can elicit significant increases in muscle hypertrophy among well-trained young men; however, HL training is superior for maximizing strength adaptations.
Effects of drop sets with resistance training on increases in muscle CSA, strength, and endurance: a pilot study
TLDR
A SDS resistance training program can simultaneously increase muscle CSA, strength, and endurance in untrained young men, even with lower training time compared to typical resistance exercise protocols using only high- or low-loads.
Greater Neural Adaptations following High- vs. Low-Load Resistance Training
TLDR
It is suggested that high-load training results in greater neural adaptations that may explain the disparate increases in muscle strength despite similar hypertrophy following high- and low- load training programs.
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TLDR
It is concluded that, as long as RT is conducted to failure, training load might not affect muscle hypertrophy in young men and a non-linear RT protocol switching loads every 2 weeks might not lead to superior musclehypertrophy nor strength gains in comparison with straight RT protocols.
Muscle activation during low- versus high-load resistance training in well-trained men
TLDR
Results indicate that training with a load of 30 % 1-RM to momentary muscular failure does not maximally activate the full motor unit pool of the quadriceps femoris and hamstrings during performance of multi-joint lower body exercise.
A Comparison of Increases in Volume Load Over 8 Weeks of Low-Versus High-Load Resistance Training
TLDR
This study indicates that low-load RT results in greater accumulations in VL compared to high- load RT over the course of 8 weeks of training.
Upper body muscle activation during low-versus high-load resistance exercise in the bench press
TLDR
Despite similarities in peak EMG amplitude, the greater results for mean and iEMG matched in HIGH suggests that heavier loads may produce greater muscle activation.
Muscular adaptations in low- versus high-load resistance training: A meta-analysis
TLDR
Training with loads ≤50% 1 RM was found to promote substantial increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in untrained individuals, but a trend was noted for superiority of heavy loading with respect to these outcome measures.
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