Low Childhood IQ and Early Adult Mortality: The Role of Explanatory Factors in the 1958 British Birth Cohort

@article{Jokela2009LowCI,
  title={Low Childhood IQ and Early Adult Mortality: The Role of Explanatory Factors in the 1958 British Birth Cohort},
  author={Markus Jokela and George David Batty and Ian J. Deary and Catharine R. Gale and Mika Kivim{\"a}ki},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2009},
  volume={124},
  pages={e380 - e388}
}
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the association between childhood IQ and later mortality risk was explained by early developmental advantages or mediated by adult sociodemographic factors and health behaviors. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Participants were 10 620 men and women from the 1958 British Birth Cohort Study whose IQ was assessed at the age of 11 years and who were followed up to age 46. Childhood covariates included birth weight, childhood height at 11 years of age, problem behaviors… Expand
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