Low‐carbohydrate diets for overweight and obesity: a systematic review of the systematic reviews

@article{Churuangsuk2018LowcarbohydrateDF,
  title={Low‐carbohydrate diets for overweight and obesity: a systematic review of the systematic reviews},
  author={Chaitong Churuangsuk and Mazouz Kherouf and Emilie Combet and Michael E J Lean},
  journal={Obesity Reviews},
  year={2018},
  volume={19},
  pages={1700 - 1718}
}
Low‐carbohydrate diets are being widely recommended, but with apparently conflicting evidence. We have conducted a formal systematic review of the published systematic reviews of RCTs between low‐carbohydrate vs. control (low‐fat/energy‐restricted) diets in adults with overweight and obesity. In MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, searched from inception to September 2017, we identified 12 systematic reviews, 10 with meta‐analyses. Differences in… Expand
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