Lotic cyprinid communities can be structured as nest webs and predicted by the stress-gradient hypothesis.

@article{Peoples2015LoticCC,
  title={Lotic cyprinid communities can be structured as nest webs and predicted by the stress-gradient hypothesis.},
  author={Brandon K. Peoples and Lori A. Blanc and Emmanuel A. Frimpong},
  journal={The Journal of animal ecology},
  year={2015},
  volume={84 6},
  pages={
          1666-77
        }
}
Little is known about how positive biotic interactions structure animal communities. Nest association is a common reproductive facilitation in which associate species spawn in nests constructed by host species. Nest-associative behaviour is nearly obligate for some species, but facultative for others; this can complicate interaction network topology. Nest web diagrams can be used to depict interactions in nesting-structured communities and generate predictions about those interactions, but have… 

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