Lost lovers linked at long last: elusive female Nanophyllium mystery solved after a century of being placed in a different genus (Phasmatodea, Phylliidae).

@article{Cumming2020LostLL,
  title={Lost lovers linked at long last: elusive female Nanophyllium mystery solved after a century of being placed in a different genus (Phasmatodea, Phylliidae).},
  author={Royce T Cumming and St{\'e}phane le Tirant and Sierra N. Teemsma and F. Hennemann and L. Willemse and Thies H B{\"u}scher},
  journal={ZooKeys},
  year={2020},
  volume={969},
  pages={
          43-84
        }
}
  • Royce T Cumming, Stéphane le Tirant, +3 authors Thies H Büscher
  • Published 2020
  • Medicine, Biology
  • ZooKeys
  • After successful laboratory rearing of both males and females from a single clutch of eggs, the genus Nanophyllium Redtenbacher, 1906 (described only from males) and the frondosum species group within Phyllium (Pulchriphyllium) Griffini, 1898 (described only from females) are found to be the opposite sexes of the same genus. This rearing observation finally elucidates the relationship of these two small body sized leaf insect groups which, for more than a century, have never been linked before… CONTINUE READING
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