Lost in translation: Mystery of the missing text solved

@article{Livio2011LostIT,
  title={Lost in translation: Mystery of the missing text solved},
  author={Mario Livio},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={479},
  pages={171-173}
}
  • M. Livio
  • Published 1 November 2011
  • Philosophy, Physics, Medicine
  • Nature
A discovered letter explains the loss of key paragraphs during the translation of one of Georges Lemaitre's papers about the expanding Universe, shows Mario Livio. 
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  • N. Bahcall
  • Medicine, Physics
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2015
In one of the most famous classic papers in the annals of science, Edwin Hubble’s 1929 PNAS article on the observed relation between distance and recession velocity of galaxies—the Hubble
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References

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The Expanding Universe
TLDR
It is conjectured that the initial impulse which started the expansion may have arisen in the process of the condensation of the primeval chaotic gases into nebulæ, and some two million nebulae lie within a distance of 140,000,000 light-years.
A RELATION BETWEEN DISTANCE AND RADIAL VELOCITY AMONG EXTRA-GALACTIC NEBULAE.
  • E. Hubble
  • Physics, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1929
TLDR
A re-examination of the question of the motion of the sun with respect to the extra-galactic nebulae, based on only those nebular distances which are believed to be fairly reliable, indicates the probability of an approximately uniform upper limit to the absolute luminosity of stars, in the late-type spirals and irregular neBulae at least.