Lost Productive Time Associated With Excess Weight in the U.S. Workforce

@article{Ricci2005LostPT,
  title={Lost Productive Time Associated With Excess Weight in the U.S. Workforce},
  author={Judith A. Ricci and Elsbeth Chee},
  journal={Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={47},
  pages={1227-1234}
}
  • J. Ricci, E. Chee
  • Published 2005
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Objective: The objective of this study was to examine health-related lost productive time (LPT) in overweight and obese workers. Methods: Cross-sectional study using data from a national telephone survey of the U.S. workforce. Body mass index defined normal-weight, overweight, and obese workers. LPT in hours and dollars was compared among the three groups. Results: Obese workers (42.3%) were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to report LPT in the previous 2 weeks than normal-weight (36.4… Expand

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