Losses as modulators of attention: review and analysis of the unique effects of losses over gains.

@article{Yechiam2013LossesAM,
  title={Losses as modulators of attention: review and analysis of the unique effects of losses over gains.},
  author={Eldad Yechiam and Guy Hochman},
  journal={Psychological bulletin},
  year={2013},
  volume={139 2},
  pages={
          497-518
        }
}
It has been shown that in certain situations losses exert a stronger effect on behavior than respective gains, and this has been commonly explained by the argument that losses are given more weight in people's decisions than respective gains. However, although much is understood about the effect of losses on cognitive processes and behavior, 2 major inconsistencies remain. First, recent empirical evidence fails to demonstrate that people avoid incentive structures that carry equivalent gains… 
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