Loss of Sex Discrimination and Male-Male Aggression in Mice Deficient for TRP2

@article{Stowers2002LossOS,
  title={Loss of Sex Discrimination and Male-Male Aggression in Mice Deficient for TRP2},
  author={Lisa Stowers and Timothy E. Holy and Markus Meister and Catherine Dulac and Georgy Koentges},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={295},
  pages={1493 - 1500}
}
The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is thought to mediate social behaviors and neuroendocrine changes elicited by pheromonal cues. The molecular mechanisms underlying the sensory response to pheromones and the behavioral repertoire induced through the VNO are not fully characterized. Using the tools of mouse genetics and multielectrode recording, we demonstrate that the sensory activation of VNO neurons requires TRP2, a putative ion channel of the transient receptor potential family that is… Expand
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