Loss of Renal Phosphate Wasting in a Child with Autosomal Dominant Hypophosphatemic Rickets Caused by a FGF23 Mutation

@article{Kruse2001LossOR,
  title={Loss of Renal Phosphate Wasting in a Child with Autosomal Dominant Hypophosphatemic Rickets Caused by a FGF23 Mutation},
  author={Klaus Kruse and Dieter Woelfel and Tim Matthias Strom},
  journal={Hormone Research in Paediatrics},
  year={2001},
  volume={55},
  pages={305 - 308}
}
A girl with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets, presented with clinical, radiological and laboratory signs of rickets at the age of 11 months. She showed a good response to the treatment with low doses of oral phosphate and calcitriol. Surprisingly, she lost her renal phosphate wasting at the age of 8 years, indicating that the disturbed phosphate metabolism can be compensated by hormonal or other factors. 

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Earlier Onset in Autosomal Dominant Hypophosphatemic Rickets of R179 than R176 Mutations in Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: Report of 20 Chinese Cases and Review of the Literature
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