Loss Aversion, Intellectual Inertia, and a Call for a More Contrarian Science: A Reply to Simonson & Kivetz and Higgins & Liberman

@article{Gal2018LossAI,
  title={Loss Aversion, Intellectual Inertia, and a Call for a More Contrarian Science: A Reply to Simonson \& Kivetz and Higgins \& Liberman},
  author={David Gal and Derek D. Rucker},
  journal={Behavioral \& Experimental Economics eJournal},
  year={2018}
}
  • David Gal, D. Rucker
  • Published 18 February 2018
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral & Experimental Economics eJournal
Higgins and Liberman (2018) and Simonson and Kivetz (2018) offer scholarly and stimulating perspectives on loss aversion and the implications for the sociology of science of its acceptance as a virtual law of nature. In our view, Higgins and Liberman (2018) largely complement our conclusion that the empirical evidence does not support loss aversion. Moreover, in alignment with our call for a contextualized perspective, they provide an excellent discourse on how a more nuanced view of reference… 
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