Loss Attention in a Dual-Task Setting

@article{Yechiam2014LossAI,
  title={Loss Attention in a Dual-Task Setting},
  author={Eldad Yechiam and Guy Hochman},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={494 - 502}
}
The positive effect of losses on performance has been explained as stemming from the increased weighting of losses relative to gains. We examine an alternative possibility whereby this effect is mediated by attentional processes. Using the dual-task paradigm, we expected that positive effects of losses on performance would emerge under attentional scarcity and diffuse to a concurrently presented task. In Study 1, decision performance was compared for a task that involved either gains or losses… 

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