Losing Sleep at the Market: Comment

@inproceedings{Pinegar2002LosingSA,
  title={Losing Sleep at the Market: Comment},
  author={J. Michael Pinegar},
  year={2002}
}
In a recent provocative paper in this journal, Mark J. Kamstra et al. (2000) test and reject the hypothesis that the mean weekend return following changes in daylight saving time equals the mean weekend return throughout the rest of the year. The authors report that the average Friday-to-Monday return on daylight-saving weekends is 200–500 percent larger than the average negative return for the other weekends of the year. The Ž nding appears to hold not only in the United States and Canada… CONTINUE READING

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