Looking in the right direction

@article{Goldenfeld2014LookingIT,
  title={Looking in the right direction},
  author={N. Goldenfeld},
  journal={RNA Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={11},
  pages={248 - 253}
}
Carl Woese is known to the scientific community primarily through his landmark contributions to microbiology, in particular, his discovery of the third Domain of Life, which came to be known as the Archaea. While it is well known how he made this discovery, through the techniques he developed based on his studies of rRNA, the reasons why he was driven in this scientific direction, and what he saw as the principle outcome of his discovery—it was not the Archaea!—are not so widely appreciated. In… Expand
3 Citations

Topics from this paper

Deep learning on butterfly phenotypes tests evolution’s oldest mathematical model
TLDR
Phenotypic analysis supports reciprocal coevolution, predicted by classical mimicry theory but since disputed, and reveals mutual convergence as an intrinsic generator for the unexpected diversity of Müllerian mimicry. Expand
Microbial community structure of a freshwater system receiving wastewater effluent
TLDR
The utility of targeted high-throughput sequencing as a tool to assess the effects of treated wastewater effluent on a receiving water system is demonstrated, and the potential for this technology to be used for routine monitoring by wastewater facilities is highlighted. Expand
Scale-invariant topology and bursty branching of evolutionary trees emerge from niche construction
TLDR
A simple, coarse-grained statistical model of niche construction coupled to simple models of speciation that recapitulates both the scale-invariant topology and the bursty pattern of diversification in time shows how dynamical scaling laws of phylogenetic trees on long timescales can reflect the indelible imprint of the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes. Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 46 REFERENCES
Microbial Biology: Microbiology's Scarred Revolutionary
TLDR
Far from being just one of life's five major kingdoms, microbes are actually two of its three broad domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya (which includes all multicellular organisms, from plants to people). Expand
Two empires or three?
  • E. Mayr
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1998
TLDR
In the last 100 years, several spectacular discoveries were made in the world of biodiversity, discoveries such as the Okapi in the Congo forest, the only living relative of the giraffes, or Latimeria in the Indian Ocean, a living coelacanth fish, but these were merely small white spots on the world map of biodiversity. Expand
How the Microbial World Saved Evolution from the Scylla of Molecular Biology and the Charybdis of the Modern Synthesis
SUMMARY In this commentary, we provide a personal overview of the conceptual history of microbiology and molecular biology over the course of the last hundred years, emphasizing the relationship ofExpand
Phylogeny and beyond: Scientific, historical, and conceptual significance of the first tree of life
TLDR
The way in which this monumental discovery was made, its context within the historical development of evolutionary thought, and how it has impacted the authors' understanding of the emergence of life and the characterization of the evolutionary process in its most general form are described. Expand
Default taxonomy: Ernst Mayr's view of the microbial world.
  • C. Woese
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1998
TLDR
This perspective is a response to a taxonomic proposal by E. Mayr that the now accepted classification of life into three primary domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya-originally proposed by myself and others--be abandoned in favor of the earlier Prokaryote-Eukaryote classification. Expand
Evolution of the genetic code
  • C. Woese
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Science of Nature
  • 2004
TLDR
A plausible scheme for the evolution of translation starting from a simple class of nucleic acid components is presented, which may appear unique, idiosyncratic, when viewed only in terms of structural details. Expand
Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya.
TLDR
It is proposed that a formal system of organisms be established in which above the level of kingdom there exists a new taxon called a "domain." Life on this planet would be seen as comprising three domains, the Bacteria, the Archaea, and the Eucarya, each containing two or more kingdoms. Expand
On the nature of global classification.
TLDR
The ultimate purpose of a global classification is not simply information storage and retrieval; such a system should also function as an heuristic representation of the evolutionary paradigm that exerts a directing influence on the course of biology. Expand
Biased gene transfer and its implications for the concept of lineage
TLDR
The evolutionary histories of three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are presented to illustrate that the concept of organismal lineage in the prokaryotic world is defined by both vertical inheritance and reticulations due to HGT. Expand
The concept of cellular evolution
TLDR
It is argued on the basis of differences between their respective translation mechanisms that the two lines do represent separate phylogenetic trees in the sense that each line of descent independently evolved to a level of organization that could be called procaryotic. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...