Looking for answers in all the wrong places : How testing facilitates learning of misinformation

@inproceedings{Gordon2015LookingFA,
  title={Looking for answers in all the wrong places : How testing facilitates learning of misinformation},
  author={Leamarie T. Gordon and Ayanna K. Thomas and John. Bulevich and J. B. Bulevich and John B. Bulevich},
  year={2015}
}
Research has consistently demonstrated that taking a test prior to receiving misleading information increases eyewitness suggestibility (Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). Retrieval Enhanced Suggestibility (RES) is characterized by two typical findings: (1) reduced access to the originally witnessed event, which has been contextualized within a reconsolidation framework (e.g., Chan & LaPaglia, 2013), and (2) increased production of misleading post-test narrative details, which has been discussed… CONTINUE READING

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