Look for good and never give up: A novel attention training treatment for childhood anxiety disorders.

@article{Waters2015LookFG,
  title={Look for good and never give up: A novel attention training treatment for childhood anxiety disorders.},
  author={Allison M Waters and Melanie J. Zimmer‐Gembeck and Michelle G. Craske and Daniel S. Pine and Brendan P. Bradley and Karin Mogg},
  journal={Behaviour research and therapy},
  year={2015},
  volume={73},
  pages={
          111-23
        }
}
Attention bias modification training (ABMT) is a promising treatment for anxiety disorders. Recent evidence suggests that attention training towards positive stimuli, using visual-search based ABMT, has beneficial effects on anxiety and attention biases in children. The present study extends this prior research using distinctive techniques designed to increase participant learning, memory consolidation, and treatment engagement. Fifty-nine clinically anxious children were randomly assigned to… Expand
A Preliminary Evaluation of a Home-based, Computer-delivered Attention Training Treatment for Anxious Children Living in Regional Communities
Many children with anxiety disorders live in communities with limited access to treatment. Attention bias modification training, a promising computer-based treatment for anxiety disorders, mayExpand
Changes in neural activation underlying attention processing of emotional stimuli following treatment with positive search training in anxious children.
TLDR
Results showed pre- to post-treatment reductions in anxiety symptoms and neural reactivity to emotional faces within a broad neural network linking frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions and integrative functions linking emotion, memory, sensory and motor processes and attention control. Expand
Efficacy and mechanisms underlying a gamified attention bias modification training in anxious youth: protocol for a randomized controlled trial
TLDR
An enhanced ABMT to target the attentional bias towards threat, in addition to classic CBT for anxiety disorders in youth, is proposed, which integrates the modified dot-probe task used in previous studies and is embedded in an engaging game to foster motivation and adherence. Expand
attentional bias modification training targeting anxiety and depression in unselected adolescents
Based on information processing models of anxiety and depression, we investigated the efficacy of multiple sessions of online attentional bias modification training to reduce attentional bias andExpand
Online Attention Bias Modification in Combination With Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Children and Adolescents With Anxiety Disorders: A Randomised Controlled Trial
TLDR
Online ABM combined withCBT does not show different efficacy compared with online ACC with CBT for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, and continuous decrease across time in primary and secondary outcomes is shown. Expand
Reducing Pediatric Anxiety through Training: an Integrative Neurocognitive Approach
Purpose of ReviewNeurocognitive interventions that target specific cognitive mechanisms underlying anxiety symptoms (e.g., attention bias to threat, negatively biased interpretations) have beenExpand
Online attentional bias modification training targeting anxiety and depression in unselected adolescents: Short- and long-term effects of a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
This large-scale randomized controlled study provided no support for the efficacy of the current online attentional bias modification training as a preventive intervention to reduce symptoms of anxiety or depression or to increase emotional resilience in unselected adolescents. Expand
Efficacy of Attention Bias Training for Child Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
A double-blind, randomized controlled trial testing ABM efficacy versus an attention control condition (CC) in 31 children diagnosed with anxiety disorder indicates that significantly more youth in the ABM versus CC group were considered treatment responders post training, lending support for the potential of ABM in reducing youth anxiety. Expand
A School-Based Comparison of Positive Search Training to Enhance Adaptive Attention Regulation with a Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention for Reducing Anxiety Symptoms in Children
TLDR
Teachers reported higher post-intervention social-emotional functioning in Year 5 students receiving the CBI but, unexpectedly, lower post-Intervention functioning in students receiving PST, which is partially consistent with hypotheses. Expand
Online visual search attentional bias modification for adolescents with heightened anxiety and depressive symptoms: A randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Results suggest that online ABM as employed in the current study has no added value as an early intervention in adolescents with heightened symptoms of anxiety and depression, with stronger effects for participants who completed more training sessions. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 108 REFERENCES
Attention training towards positive stimuli in clinically anxious children
TLDR
Training anxious children to focus attention on positive features of their environment may be a promising treatment in pediatric anxiety. Expand
Attention training in socially anxious children: a multiple baseline design analysis.
TLDR
Preliminary evidence regarding the utility of ATT for treatment of childhood SOC is provided, and future research is needed to further examine the use of this treatment strategy with youth and to explore the mechanisms of change. Expand
Visual search attentional bias modification reduced social phobia in adolescents.
TLDR
Visual search ABM might be beneficial in changing attentional bias and social phobia in adolescents, but further research with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up is needed. Expand
A case series of attention modification in clinically anxious youths.
TLDR
The initial efficacy of a four-week attention modification program designed to train attention away from threat in 16 children and adolescents diagnosed with DSM-IV anxiety disorders was examined, and 12 of 16 youths no longer met criteria for any anxiety diagnosis at post-treatment. Expand
Attention Bias Modification Treatment for children with anxiety disorders who do not respond to cognitive behavioral therapy: a case series.
TLDR
Findings from an open trial of Attention Bias Modification Treatment support the potential promise of ABMT as a feasible adjuvant treatment that reduces anxiety and impairment among child anxiety CBT nonresponders. Expand
Attention bias modification treatment for pediatric anxiety disorders: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
ABM, compared with two control conditions, reduces pediatric anxiety symptoms and severity and further study of efficacy and underlying mechanisms is warranted. Expand
Attention bias modification treatment augmenting effects on cognitive behavioral therapy in children with anxiety: randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Active and placebo ABMT might augment the clinical response to CBT for anxiety, and this effect could arise from benefits associated with performing computer-based paradigms such as the dot-probe task. Expand
Threat bias in attention orienting: evidence of specificity in a large community-based study
TLDR
The association between internalizing symptoms and biased orienting varies with the nature of developmental psychopathology, and both the form and severity of psychopathology moderates threat-related attention biases in children. Expand
Attentional retraining: a randomized clinical trial for pathological worry.
TLDR
Data support the view that an attentional bias in favor of threat cues is an important causal factor in generalized anxiety and suggest that a computer-based attentional retraining procedure may be an effective component of treatment. Expand
Neural plasticity in response to attention training in anxiety
TLDR
The ERP data suggest that attention training modulates top-down processes of attention control rather than processes of early attention orienting, and affects anxious participants whereas non-anxious participants seem not to respond to it. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...