Longitudinal population-based twin study of retrospectively reported premenstrual symptoms and lifetime major depression.

@article{Kendler1998LongitudinalPT,
  title={Longitudinal population-based twin study of retrospectively reported premenstrual symptoms and lifetime major depression.},
  author={K. Kendler and L. Karkowski and L. Corey and M. Neale},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={1998},
  volume={155 9},
  pages={
          1234-40
        }
}
OBJECTIVE While family and twin studies suggest that retrospectively reported premenstrual symptoms are heritable, these studies have not accounted for the unreliability of such measures. In addition, we know little about the relationship of the familial risk factors for premenstrual symptoms and major depression. METHOD Lifetime major depression and premenstrual-related tiredness, sadness, and irritability were assessed twice over 6 years in 1,312 menstruating female twins ascertained from a… Expand
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