Longitudinal Studies of Cognition in First Episode Psychosis: A Systematic Review of the Literature

@article{Bozikas2011LongitudinalSO,
  title={Longitudinal Studies of Cognition in First Episode Psychosis: A Systematic Review of the Literature},
  author={Vasilis P. Bozikas and Christina Andreou},
  journal={Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2011},
  volume={45},
  pages={108 - 93}
}
  • V. Bozikas, C. Andreou
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Although cognitive deficits are recognized as a core feature in schizophrenia, their evolution over the course of the illness is still debated. Longitudinal studies of cognition in patients after a first episode of psychosis (FEP) provide extremely useful information, in that they include an adequate and realistic baseline measure of cognitive performance, while at the same time minimizing the effect of confounding variables associated with chronicity. The aim of this systematic review was to… Expand

Paper Mentions

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TLDR
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