Long-term outcome of individuals with pure red cell aplasia and antierythropoietin antibodies in patients treated with recombinant epoetin: a follow-up report from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (RADAR) Project.

@article{Bennett2005LongtermOO,
  title={Long-term outcome of individuals with pure red cell aplasia and antierythropoietin antibodies in patients treated with recombinant epoetin: a follow-up report from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (RADAR) Project.},
  author={Charles L Bennett and Denis Cournoyer and Kenneth R. Carson and J{\'e}r{\^o}me Rossert and Stefano Luminari and Andrew M Evens and Francesco Locatelli and Steven M. Belknap and June M Mckoy and Edward A Lyons and Benjamin Youngho Kim and Rishi Sharma and Stacey Costello and Edwin B Toffelmire and George A Wells and Hans A. Messner and Paul R. Yarnold and Steven M Trifilio and Dennis W. Raisch and Timothy Michael Kuzel and Allen R. Nissenson and Lay-Cheng Lim and Martin S. Tallman and Nicole Casadevall},
  journal={Blood},
  year={2005},
  volume={106 10},
  pages={3343-7}
}
Since its introduction in 1988, recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin) has been standard treatment for patients with anemia due to chronic kidney disease. From 1998 to 2004, nearly 200 epoetin-treated persons with chronic kidney disease developed antibodies to epoetin, resulting in pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). The majority of these patients received Eprex, an epoetin alfa product marketed exclusively outside the United States. Herein, we report on the long-term outcome of these individuals… CONTINUE READING