Long-term outcome following traumatic brain injury: A comparison of subjective reports by those injured and their relatives

@article{Draper2009LongtermOF,
  title={Long-term outcome following traumatic brain injury: A comparison of subjective reports by those injured and their relatives},
  author={Kristy Draper and Jennie Louise Ponsford},
  journal={Neuropsychological Rehabilitation},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={645 - 661}
}
Many long-term outcome studies have documented changes following injury using subjective reports from TBI patients and close others. It is known that factors such as self-awareness and emotional adjustment can influence subjective reports, but there has been limited research comparing reports by those injured with those of their close others at longer periods post-injury. The aims of the present study were to compare TBI participants' and close others' subjective reports of cognitive and… 
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