Long-term impacts of an introduced ungulate in native grasslands: Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) in New Zealand’s Southern Alps

@article{Cruz2016LongtermIO,
  title={Long-term impacts of an introduced ungulate in native grasslands: Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) in New Zealand’s Southern Alps},
  author={Jennyffer Cruz and Caroline Thomson and J P Parkes and Ingrid Gerda Gruner and David M. Forsyth},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2016},
  volume={19},
  pages={339-349}
}
Ungulates have been widely introduced to new locations, often increasing to high densities that impact on native plant communities. Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) were introduced to New Zealand in 1904 and now occupy about 9600 km2 of the Southern Alps. Managers aim to control tahr to reduce impacts to native montane grasslands. We used a network of 111 permanent plots in eight catchments to estimate the long-term impacts of tahr on total vegetation cover and snow tussock (Chionochloa… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Current Changes in Alpine Ecosystems of Pacific Islands
Alpine ecosystems in the Pacific Islands are isolated and unique, characterized by high levels of endemism. Only Hawai‘i and New Zealand have elevations high enough to contain substantial alpineExpand
GREEN IGUANAS: A THREAT TO MAN AND WILD IN FIJI ISLANDS?
Green iguanas are heavily hunted and traded in their native range, and apprehended as invasives in their introduced range, where their populations have become increasingly challenging to monitor andExpand
Introduction to the Special Issue: Ungulates and invasive species: quantifying impacts and understanding interactions
TLDR
This Introduction to this issue highlights the context of the problems and summarizes and synthesizes insights from these papers, which were expanded for this special issue of AoB PLANTS. Expand
Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) recreational hunting values
  • G. Kerr
  • Geography
  • Wildlife Research
  • 2019
Context Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus) are a valued game resource that can cause environmental harm, requiring control of tahr populations below policy-prescribed thresholds. Effective gameExpand
Experience and Lessons from Alien and Invasive Animal Control Projects in South Africa
South Africa has a rich history of managing invasive alien animal populations. This chapter explores examples of animal control projects, their resourcing and degree of success or failure. Out ofExpand
Predator Free 2050: A flawed conservation policy displaces higher priorities and better, evidence‐based alternatives
1Centre for Biodiversity & Restoration Ecology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand 2Biodiversity Department, Greater Wellington Regional Council, Wellington, New ZealandExpand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 72 REFERENCES
Long-term effects of defoliation : incomplete recovery of a New Zealand alpine tussock grass, Chionochloa pallens, after 20 years
TLDR
Recovery of other native snow tussock grasses in these alpine habitats damaged by deer grazing is likely to take even longer, and the effects of a single severe defoliation on biomass will persist for nearly three decades. Expand
Long‐term harvesting and male migration in a New Zealand population of Himalayan tahr Hemitragus jemlahicus
TLDR
Managers need to consider the effects of harvesting on the abundance and distribution of sexes within an introduced population of Himalayan tahr in the Two Thumb and Sibbald Ranges, New Zealand when designing and interpreting harvest and monitoring programmes. Expand
Increasing Himalayan tahr and decreasing chamois densities in the eastern Southern Alps, New Zealand: evidence for interspecific competition
TLDR
It is concluded that intensive aerial hunting of tahr during 1967–1983 reduced tahsr densities such that chamois could co-exist with tahR, and that increasing densities of tAHr exclude ch amois from all but the `best' habitats. Expand
SNOW TUSSOCK (CHIONOCHLOA) POPULATION RESPONSE TO REMOVAL OF SHEEP AND EUROPEAN HARES, CANTERBURY, NEW-ZEALAND
TLDR
Snow tussock population structures and seedling regeneration were investigated in 10 montane-subalpine stands on formerly forested sites in the Harper-Avoca catchment, Canterbury, subjected to different histories of sheep grazing and browsing by European hares. Expand
Landscape‐level vegetation recovery from herbivory: progress after four decades of invasive red deer control
TLDR
The results suggest that after nearly four decades, even low densities of introduced herbivores may restrict ecosystem recovery, and therefore, restoring herbivore-disturbed ecosystems by solely manipulating herbivor population numbers may require a long-term perspective. Expand
INTRODUCED BROWSING MAMMALS IN NEW ZEALAND NATURAL FORESTS: ABOVEGROUND AND BELOWGROUND CONSEQUENCES
TLDR
The results show that the introduction of these mammals to New Zealand has caused far-ranging effects at both the community and ecosystem levels of resolution, with particularly adverse effects for indigenous plant com- munities and populations of most groups of litter-dwelling mesofauna and macrofauna. Expand
Daily movement and activity of female and juvenile Himalayan thar (Hemitragus jemlahicus) in the eastern southern Alps, New Zealand
TLDR
The feeding pressure during daylight on four vegetation associations showed that tall snow tussock grasslands at high altitudes were likely to be the most susceptible to modification and lower altitude associations received more intense feeding pressureDuring spring, but were rarely used in winter. Expand
Recovery of northern Fiordland alpine grasslands after reduction in the deer population
TLDR
A significant recovery of food plants preferred by introduced deer occurred between 1969 and 1984 on 57 permanent plots in the alpine grasslands of northern Fiordland, and several studies suggest the vegetation preferred by deer was some of the best former habitat of the takahe, an endangered rail. Expand
The slippery slope of exporting invasive species: the case of Himalayan tahr arriving in South America
TLDR
The future of Himalayan tahr in South America now hinges solely on releases or escapes, and calls for more leadership and better standards by exporting countries, especially if they had the chance to experience the consequences of having received the exotic species earlier. Expand
Factors Preventing the Recovery of New Zealand Forests Following Control of Invasive Deer
TLDR
The contributions that scientific research can make to effective forest restoration are considered, including em- pirically based forest-dynamics models that place regeneration in the context of other processes, such as dis- turbance, soil fertility, and multiple invasive organisms. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...