Long-term functional benefits of selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy.

@article{Dudley2013LongtermFB,
  title={Long-term functional benefits of selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy.},
  author={R. Dudley and M. Parolin and B. Gagnon and R. Saluja and R. Yap and K. Montpetit and J. Ruck and C. Poulin and Marie-Andr{\'e}e Cantin and T. Benaroch and J. Farmer},
  journal={Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics},
  year={2013},
  volume={12 2},
  pages={
          142-50
        }
}
OBJECT Large-scale natural history studies of gross motor development have shown that children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) plateau during childhood and actually decline through adolescence. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a well-recognized treatment for spastic CP, but little is known about long-term outcomes of this treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the durability of functional outcomes in a large number of patients through adolescence and into early adulthood using… Expand
Long-term outcome after selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with spastic cerebral palsy
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The case of a teenager who underwent selective dorsal rhizotomy for the management of spasticity secondary to transverse myelitis resulted in completely loose lower limbs and an excellent functional outcome, raising the possibility that the use of SDR could be expanded to include other pathologies. Expand
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