Long-term effects of an intervention on psychosocial work factors among healthcare professionals in a hospital setting

@article{Bourbonnais2010LongtermEO,
  title={Long-term effects of an intervention on psychosocial work factors among healthcare professionals in a hospital setting},
  author={Ren{\'e}e Bourbonnais and Chantal Brisson and Michel V{\'e}zina},
  journal={Occupational and Environmental Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={68},
  pages={479 - 486}
}
Objective This study assessed the long-term effects of a workplace intervention aimed at reducing adverse psychosocial work factors (psychological demands, decision latitude, social support and effort–reward imbalance) and mental health problems among health care professionals in an acute care hospital. Methods A quasi-experimental design with a control group was used. Pre-intervention (71% response rate) and 3-year post-intervention measures (60% response rate) were collected by telephone… Expand
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