Long-term consistency in speech/language profiles: I. Developmental and academic outcomes.

@article{Beitchman1996LongtermCI,
  title={Long-term consistency in speech/language profiles: I. Developmental and academic outcomes.},
  author={Joseph H. Beitchman and Beth Wilson and Elizabeth Brownlie and Hazel Walters and William J. Lancee},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry},
  year={1996},
  volume={35 6},
  pages={
          804-14
        }
}
OBJECTIVE This study examined the 7-year developmental and academic outcome of speech/language-impaired and control children selected from a community sample. METHOD Speech/language and psychiatric measures were administered to the children at ages 5 and 12.5 years. Using children's age 5 speech/language test results, a cluster analysis was performed to ascertain whether specific linguistic subgroups would emerge. The long-term consistency of these subgroups was explored. The association… 

Long-term consistency in speech/language profiles: II. Behavioral, emotional, and social outcomes.

Empirically supported speech/language classifications identified as early as age 5 were associated with behavioral disturbance in late childhood, and the need for effective intervention with speech/ language-impaired children is identified.

Fourteen-year follow-up of children with and without speech/language impairments: speech/language stability and outcomes.

The present replication and extension of these findings with a sound methodology enables greater confidence in their use for prognostic, planning, and research purposes.

The Relationship Between Speech and Language Problems and the Outcomes of Language Tests

Objectives: Language tests are performed in order to detect a possible language disorder in children and to determine whether its cause is auditory, receptive, expressive, or an overall problem. The

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Early LI rather than speech impairment is clearly associated with continued academic difficulties into adulthood, and results speak to the need for intensive, early intervention for LI youngsters.

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This study examines a group of children who had attended language unit provision between the ages of 3;6 and 7 years. At follow-up the children were between 7;10 and 13;3 years (mean 9.9 years). Of

Academic Outcomes in Bilingual Children With Developmental Language Disorder: A Longitudinal Study

Children with DLD had more frequent grade retention, and their academic marks were significantly lower than those of their peers in all the cycles and for all academic subjects with a high language dependency (all except physical education and mathematics).

Stability of Language and Literacy Profiles of Children With Language Impairment in the Public Schools.

These results provide further evidence regarding the heterogeneity of children with language impairment served in the public schools, indicating that differences may be best conceptualized along a continuum of severity.

Effectiveness of 1:1 speech and language therapy for older children with (developmental) language disorder.

Direct 1:1 intervention with an SLT can be effective for all areas of language for older children with (D)LD, regardless of their gender, receptive language or ASD status, or age.
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References

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Long-term consistency in speech/language profiles: II. Behavioral, emotional, and social outcomes.

Empirically supported speech/language classifications identified as early as age 5 were associated with behavioral disturbance in late childhood, and the need for effective intervention with speech/ language-impaired children is identified.

Seven-year follow-up of speech/language-impaired and control children: speech/language stability and outcome.

OBJECTIVE This study examined the 7-year outcome of speech/language (S/L) impaired and control children selected from a community sample at age 5 years. METHOD Two hundred fifteen children

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