Long-term anticonvulsant therapy leads to low bone mineral density--evidence for direct drug effects of phenytoin and carbamazepine on human osteoblast-like cells.

@article{Feldkamp2000LongtermAT,
  title={Long-term anticonvulsant therapy leads to low bone mineral density--evidence for direct drug effects of phenytoin and carbamazepine on human osteoblast-like cells.},
  author={Joachim Feldkamp and Andrea Becker and O.- W. Witte and Darcell P. Scharff and Werner Alfred Scherbaum},
  journal={Experimental and clinical endocrinology & diabetes : official journal, German Society of Endocrinology [and] German Diabetes Association},
  year={2000},
  volume={108 1},
  pages={37-43}
}
Anticonvulsant therapy causes changes in calcium and bone metabolism and may lead to decreased bone mass with the risk of osteoporotic fractures. The two widely used antiepileptic drugs phenytoin and carbamazepine are recognized to have direct effects on bone cells. The aim of our study was to measure the influence of long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs on bone mineral density (BMD) and to look on direct effects of carbamazepine and phenytoin on human osteoblast-like cells. BMD was… CONTINUE READING
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