Long-term Hardware-related Complications of Deep Brain Stimulation

@article{Oh2002LongtermHC,
  title={Long-term Hardware-related Complications of Deep Brain Stimulation},
  author={Michael Y. Oh and Aviva Abosch and Seong Hyun Kim and Anthony E. Lang and Andres M. Lozano},
  journal={Neurosurgery},
  year={2002},
  volume={50},
  pages={1268-1276}
}
OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence of long-term hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation (DBS). METHODS The study design is a retrospective chart review of a single-surgeon, single-institution experience with DBS in 84 consecutive cases from 1993 to 1999. Only patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year were considered. Five patients were excluded because trial stimulation failed to achieve pain relief (n = 4) or because the procedure was aborted owing to hemorrhage (n = 1… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The RNS® System Pivotal study is designed to assess safety and demonstrate that the RNS® System is effective as an adjunctive (add-on) therapy in reducing the frequency of seizures… Expand
ConditionsEpilepsy
InterventionDevice, Procedure
Long-Term Surgical and Hardware-Related Complications of Deep Brain Stimulation
  • P. Doshi
  • Medicine
  • Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
  • 2011
TLDR
DBS surgery is a relatively safe surgery, with most of the complications being minor, without long-term morbidity, and the complication rate in elderly patients is comparable to that in younger patients, however, confusion is more frequent in this age group, and patients and relatives can be prepared to accept this as a transient morbidity. Expand
Hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation: a ten year experience
TLDR
Increased experience and adaptation of surgical technique are the main determinants for avoidance of hardware-related complications in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), over a long period of time. Expand
Clinical Article Hardware-related complications of deep brain stimulation: a ten year experience
TLDR
Increased experience and adaptation of surgical technique are the main determinants for avoidance of hardware-related complications in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Expand
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TLDR
Stereotactic implantation of electrodes for DBS, if performed with multiplanar three-dimensional imaging and advanced treatment planning software, is a safe procedure with no mortality and low morbidity. Expand
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TLDR
This study took the form of a retrospective chart review on a series of consecutive patients who were treated successfully with insertion of deep brain stimulators at a single centre by a single surgeon between 1999 and 2005, observing a higher proportion of early complications in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonic patients. Expand
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TLDR
The retrospective clinical notes review of gained in a two-centre, single-surgeon study experience of 108 consecutive DBS cases between 1996 and 2002 shows that infections due to DBS-hardware can result in considerable levels of morbidity. Expand
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TLDR
Analysis of the complications of a single surgeon at one institution over a 10-year period shows a declining complication rate related to accumulated experience and better hardware design. Expand
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TLDR
Confusion is the most common complication in simultaneous bilateral DBS targeting the subthalamic nucleus, especially in patients with severe Parkinson’s disease, and with increasing experience of surgeons, complete obedience to intraoperative surgical routines and reasonable application of the microelectrode recording technique, other complications could be reduced. Expand
Surgical and Hardware Complications of Deep Brain Stimulation-A Single Surgeon Experience of 519 Cases Over 20 Years.
TLDR
Erosion and infection of the surgical site represents the most frequent hardware complication and the complication rate also decreases with cumulative years of experience, demonstrating a learning curve effect. Expand
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TLDR
A prospective analysis of patients receiving DBS therapy in two Canadian centres over a four-year period found that hardware complications were not common and it is possible that a straight scalp incision instead of curvilinear incision may lead to an increase in the rate of infection. Expand
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